Ulhasnagar Sindhunagar City News, Events - August-2017
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News Archive of Ulhasnagar / Sindhunagar City

August-2017 News & Updates from the City of Ulhasnagar/Sindhunagar, Maharashtra, India. Ulhasnagar City News indexed across timeline for easy retrieval.

2017-08-30Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety - fullstory - Press Trust of India
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar remembers 2005 remembers 2005 with dread Mumbai, Aug 30 (PTI) As the skies opened up and a city scurried for cover from torrential rain and high waves that came flooding in from the sea, memories of July 26, 2005 came back to haunt Captain Shivraj Mane, a Merchant Navy officer. That was the day 12 years ago when at least 500 people were killed, some electrocuted, other crushed under falling walls or drowned, with 94 cm of rain in a single day. That was also the day that Mane, like thousands of other Mumbaikars, began walking home through the flooded streets of Mumbai and its suburbs. He reached home in the distant Mumbai suburb of Ambarnath only on the third day. Being a navy man, he was used to water. But nothing had prepared him for the nightmare that was to come. He waded, "sans protection gear very unlike a naval officer", rode a buffalo on waterlogged stretches and saw human carcasses floating by, images imprinted vividly in his mind. It's a terrible sense of d j vu, said the 31-year-old, reliving the day that every citizen of the Maximum City remembers with dread. "It was raining like any other monsoon day that day in Mumbai and Thane when I took a morning local train for Nerul (in Navi Mumbai) from Ambarnath for some official work," he recalled. By afternoon, he was done with work and should have been home in about two and half hours. It took two and a half days instead. "I was preoccupied with work and didn't realise what was happening outside. I realised only much later. I took a train from Nerul railway station on the Harbour Line, but it could not proceed beyond Tilak Nagar station, on my way to Kurla from where I had planned to take another local train for Ambarnath." So he chose to walk like other co-passengers along the track. When they reached Kurla, the magnitude of the destruction hit them. The railway tracks and platform had disappeared under water. "I opted to stay that night on a foot over-bridge like many others. I was stuck, but at a safer place. I, however, could not contact anyone at home to tell them about my whereabouts as my phone died. We were without food. "Sensing the magnitude of the calamity, the locals offered the commuters khichdi. That's Mumbai for you!" The next morning, on July 26, it was still raining and Mane walked on to Thane, 21 km away from Kurla. He was planning to reach Ambarnath via the Thane-Kalyan-Vithalwadi- Ulhasnagar route. "I did not opt to walk along rail tracks as the road was less waterlogged and a bit safer. Wherever and whenever it was possible, I took lifts to reach Thane and from there again covered a distance of around 25 km to reach Kongaon (in Kalyan taluka) by road." On his way to Ulhasnagar, he could see buffaloes coming out of a shed that had gone under water. "I rode one of the swimming buffaloes to cross the river and waterlogged roads to Vithalwadi. When I reached Ulhasnagar from Vitthalwadi, I could see dead bodies of slum dwellers living near a nullah floating in the water. It is a sight I will never forget," Mane said. "They died in the worst possible way water can kill anyone. All day I travelled by road to reach Ulhasnagar, where I took a shelter at a friend's place. I was drenched and exhausted." Mane managed to get his phone charged from an inverter in a caf and speak to his parents. The rain stopped only on the morning of July 28. He got home, covering the last bit of the distance in an autorickshaw. "I had lost all my key documents, including passport during that period. My shoes got torn, my legs were swollen. It took next eight days for my feet to recover. "Those were the two toughest days of my life. I just pray there is no repeat of the rains and the miseries." It was a wish many other Mumbaikars echoed fervently.
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety - fullstory - Press Trust of India
2017-08-30Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar - India Today
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar August 30, 2017 | UPDATED 15:50 IST remembers 2005 with dread Mumbai, Aug 30 (PTI) As the skies opened up and a city scurried for cover from torrential rain and high waves that came flooding in from the sea, memories of July 26, 2005 came back to haunt Captain Shivraj Mane, a Merchant Navy officer. That was the day 12 years ago when at least 500 people were killed, some electrocuted, other crushed under falling walls or drowned, with 94 cm of rain in a single day. That was also the day that Mane, like thousands of other Mumbaikars, began walking home through the flooded streets of Mumbai and its suburbs. He reached home in the distant Mumbai suburb of Ambarnath only on the third day. Being a navy man, he was used to water. But nothing had prepared him for the nightmare that was to come. He waded, "sans protection gear very unlike a naval officer", rode a buffalo on waterlogged stretches and saw human carcasses floating by, images imprinted vividly in his mind. Its a terrible sense of déjà vu, said the 31-year-old, reliving the day that every citizen of the Maximum City remembers with dread. "It was raining like any other monsoon day that day in Mumbai and Thane when I took a morning local train for Nerul (in Navi Mumbai) from Ambarnath for some official work," he recalled. By afternoon, he was done with work and should have been home in about two and half hours. It took two and a half days instead."I was preoccupied with work and didnt realise what was happening outside. I realised only much later. I took a train from Nerul railway station on the Harbour Line, but it could not proceed beyond Tilak Nagar station, on my way to Kurla from where I had planned to take another local train for Ambarnath." So he chose to walk like other co-passengers along the track. When they reached Kurla, the magnitude of the destruction hit them. The railway tracks and platform had disappeared under water. "I opted to stay that night on a foot over-bridge like many others. I was stuck, but at a safer place. I, however, could not contact anyone at home to tell them about my whereabouts as my phone died. We were without food. "Sensing the magnitude of the calamity, the locals offered the commuters khichdi. Thats Mumbai for you!" The next morning, on July 26, it was still raining and Mane walked on to Thane, 21 km away from Kurla. He was planning to reach Ambarnath via the Thane-Kalyan-Vithalwadi- Ulhasnagar route. "I did not opt to walk along rail tracks as the road was less waterlogged and a bit safer. Wherever and whenever it was possible, I took lifts to reach Thane and from there again covered a distance of around 25 km to reach Kongaon (in Kalyan taluka) by road." On his way to Ulhasnagar, he could see buffaloes coming out of a shed that had gone under water. "I rode one of the swimming buffaloes to cross the river and waterlogged roads to Vithalwadi. When I reached Ulhasnagar from Vitthalwadi, I could see dead bodies of slum dwellers living near a nullah floating in the water. It is a sight I will never forget," Mane said. "They died in the worst possible way water can kill anyone. All day I travelled by road to reach Ulhasnagar, where I took a shelter at a friends place. I was drenched and exhausted." Mane managed to get his phone charged from an inverter in a café and speak to his parents. The rain stopped only on the morning of July 28. He got home, covering the last bit of the distance in an autorickshaw. "I had lost all my key documents, including passport during that period. My shoes got torn, my legs were swollen. It took next eight days for my feet to recover. "Those were the two toughest days of my life. I just pray there is no repeat of the rains and the miseries." It was a wish many other Mumbaikars echoed fervently. PTI ENM MIN SRY
2017-08-30Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar remembers 2005 with dread - The Indian Express
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar remembers 2005 with dread Captain Shivraj Mane, a Merchant Navy officer, waded, "sans protection gear very unlike a naval officer", rode a buffalo on waterlogged stretches as human carcasses floated by. It's a terrible sense of déjà vu, said the 31-year-old, reliving the day. Published:August 30, 2017 4:18 pm As the skies opened up and a city scurried for cover from torrential rain and high waves that came flooding in from the sea, memories of July 26, 2005 came back to haunt Captain Shivraj Mane, a Merchant Navy officer. That was the day 12 years ago when at least 500 people were killed, some electrocuted, other crushed under falling walls or drowned, with 94 cm of rain in a single day. That was also the day that Mane, like thousands of other Mumbaikars, began walking home through the flooded streets of Mumbai and its suburbs. He reached home in the distant Mumbai suburb of Ambarnath only on the third day. Being a navy man, he was used to water. But nothing had prepared him for the nightmare that was to come. He waded, “sans protection gear very unlike a naval officer”, rode a buffalo on waterlogged stretches and saw human carcasses floating by, images imprinted vividly in his mind. It’s a terrible sense of déjà vu, said the 31-year-old, reliving the day that every citizen of the Maximum City remembers with dread. “It was raining like any other monsoon day that day in Mumbai and Thane when I took a morning local train for Nerul (in Navi Mumbai) from Ambarnath for some official work,” he recalled. By afternoon, he was done with work and should have been home in about two and half hours. It took two and a half days instead. “I was preoccupied with work and didn’t realise what was happening outside. I realised only much later. I took a train from Nerul railway station on the Harbour Line, but it could not proceed beyond Tilak Nagar station, on my way to Kurla from where I had planned to take another local train for Ambarnath.” So he chose to walk like other co-passengers along the track. When they reached Kurla, the magnitude of the destruction hit them. The railway tracks and platform had disappeared under water. “I opted to stay that night on a foot over-bridge like many others. I was stuck, but at a safer place. I, however, could not contact anyone at home to tell them about my whereabouts as my phone died. We were without food. Sensing the magnitude of the calamity, the locals offered the commuters khichdi. That’s Mumbai for you!” The next morning, on July 26, it was still raining and Mane walked on to Thane, 21 km away from Kurla. He was planning to reach Ambarnath via the Thane-Kalyan-Vithalwadi-Ulhasnagar route. “I did not opt to walk along rail tracks as the road was less waterlogged and a bit safer. Wherever and whenever it was possible, I took lifts to reach Thane and from there again covered a distance of around 25 km to reach Kongaon (in Kalyan taluka) by road.” On his way to Ulhasnagar, he could see buffaloes coming out of a shed that had gone under water. “I rode one of the swimming buffaloes to cross the river and waterlogged roads to Vithalwadi. When I reached Ulhasnagar from Vitthalwadi, I could see dead bodies of slum dwellers living near a nullah floating in the water. It is a sight I will never forget,” Mane said. “They died in the worst possible way water can kill anyone. All day I travelled by road to reach Ulhasnagar, where I took a shelter at a friend’s place. I was drenched and exhausted.” Mane managed to get his phone charged from an inverter in a café and speak to his parents. The rain stopped only on the morning of July 28. He got home, covering the last bit of the distance in an autorickshaw. “I had lost all my key documents, including passport during that period. My shoes got torn, my legs were swollen. It took next eight days for my feet to recover. “Those were the two toughest days of my life. I just pray there is no repeat of the rains and the miseries.” It was a wish many other Mumbaikars echoed fervently.
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar remembers 2005 with dread - The Indian Express
2017-08-30Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar remembers 2005 with dread - The New Indian Express
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar remembers 2005 with dread Published: 30th August 2017 04:49 PM Last Updated: 30th August 2017 04:49 PM MUMBAI: As the skies opened up and a city scurried for cover from torrential rain and high waves that came flooding in from the sea, memories of July 26, 2005 came back to haunt Captain Shivraj Mane, a Merchant Navy officer. That was the day 12 years ago when at least 500 people were killed, some electrocuted, other crushed under falling walls or drowned, with 94 cm of rain in a single day. That was also the day that Mane, like thousands of other Mumbaikars, began walking home through the flooded streets of Mumbai and its suburbs. He reached home in the distant Mumbai suburb of Ambarnath only on the third day. Being a navy man, he was used to water. But nothing had prepared him for the nightmare that was to come. He waded, "sans protection gear very unlike a naval officer", rode a buffalo on waterlogged stretches and saw human carcasses floating by, images imprinted vividly in his mind. It's a terrible sense of déjà vu, said the 31-year-old, reliving the day that every citizen of the Maximum City remembers with dread. "It was raining like any other monsoon day that day in Mumbai and Thane when I took a morning local train for Nerul (in Navi Mumbai) from Ambarnath for some official work," he recalled. By afternoon, he was done with work and should have been home in about two and half hours. It took two and a half days instead. "I was preoccupied with work and didn't realise what was happening outside. I realised only much later. I took a train from Nerul railway station on the Harbour Line, but it could not proceed beyond Tilak Nagar station, on my way to Kurla from where I had planned to take another local train for Ambarnath." So he chose to walk like other co-passengers along the track. When they reached Kurla, the magnitude of the destruction hit them. The railway tracks and platform had disappeared under water. "I opted to stay that night on a foot over-bridge like many others. I was stuck, but at a safer place. I, however, could not contact anyone at home to tell them about my whereabouts as my phone died. We were without food. "Sensing the magnitude of the calamity, the locals offered the commuters khichdi. That's Mumbai for you!" The next morning, on July 26, it was still raining and Mane walked on to Thane, 21 km away from Kurla. He was planning to reach Ambarnath via the Thane-Kalyan-VithalwadiUlhasnagar route. "I did not opt to walk along rail tracks as the road was less waterlogged and a bit safer. Wherever and whenever it was possible, I took lifts to reach Thane and from there again covered a distance of around 25 km to reach Kongaon (in Kalyan taluka) by road." On his way to Ulhasnagar, he could see buffaloes coming out of a shed that had gone under water. "I rode one of the swimming buffaloes to cross the river and waterlogged roads to Vithalwadi. When I reached Ulhasnagar from Vitthalwadi, I could see dead bodies of slum dwellers living near a nullah floating in the water. It is a sight I will never forget," Mane said. "They died in the worst possible way water can kill anyone. All day I travelled by road to reach Ulhasnagar, where I took a shelter at a friend's place. I was drenched and exhausted." Mane managed to get his phone charged from an inverter in a café and speak to his parents. The rain stopped only on the morning of July 28. He got home, covering the last bit of the distance in an autorickshaw. "I had lost all my key documents, including passport during that period. My shoes got torn, my legs were swollen. It took next eight days for my feet to recover. "Those were the two toughest days of my life. I just pray there is no repeat of the rains and the miseries." It was a wish many other Mumbaikars echoed fervently.
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar remembers 2005 with dread - The New Indian Express
2017-08-29Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar - India Today
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar August 29, 2017 | UPDATED 19:25 IST remembers 2005 with dread Mumbai, Aug 29 (PTI) As the skies opened up and a city scurried for cover from torrential rain and high waves that came flooding in from the sea, memories of July 26, 2005 came back to haunt Captain Shivraj Mane, a Merchant Navy officer. That was the day 12 years ago when at least 500 people were killed, some electrocuted, other crushed under falling walls or drowned, with 94 cm of rain in a single day. That was also the day that Mane, like thousands of other Mumbaikars, began walking home through the flooded streets of Mumbai and its suburbs. He reached home in the distant Mumbai suburb of Ambarnath only on the third day. Being a navy man, he was used to water. But nothing had prepared him for the nightmare that was to come. He waded, "sans protection gear very unlike a naval officer", rode a buffalo on waterlogged stretches and saw human carcasses floating by, images imprinted vividly in his mind. Its a terrible sense of déjà vu, said the 31-year-old, reliving the day that every citizen of the Maximum City remembers with dread. "It was raining like any other monsoon day that day in Mumbai and Thane when I took a morning local train for Nerul (in Navi Mumbai) from Ambarnath for some official work," he recalled. By afternoon, he was done with work and should have been home in about two and half hours. It took two and a half days instead. "I was preoccupied with work and didnt realise what was happening outside. I realised only much later. I took a train from Nerul railway station on the Harbour Line, but it could not proceed beyond Tilak Nagar station, on my way to Kurla from where I had planned to take another local train for Ambarnath." So he chose to walk like other co-passengers along the track. When they reached Kurla, the magnitude of the destruction hit them. The railway tracks and platform had disappeared under water. "I opted to stay that night on a foot over-bridge like many others. I was stuck, but at a safer place. I, however, could not contact anyone at home to tell them about my whereabouts as my phone died. We were without food. "Sensing the magnitude of the calamity, the locals offered the commuters khichdi. Thats Mumbai for you!" The next morning, on July 26, it was still raining and Mane walked on to Thane, 21 km away from Kurla. He was planning to reach Ambarnath via the Thane-Kalyan-Vithalwadi- Ulhasnagar route. "I did not opt to walk along rail tracks as the road was less waterlogged and a bit safer. Wherever and whenever it was possible, I took lifts to reach Thane and from there again covered a distance of around 25 km to reach Kongaon (in Kalyan taluka) by road." On his way to Ulhasnagar, he could see buffaloes coming out of a shed that had gone under water. "I rode one of the swimming buffaloes to cross the river and waterlogged roads to Vithalwadi. When I reached Ulhasnagar from Vitthalwadi, I could see dead bodies of slum dwellers living near a nullah floating in the water. It is a sight I will never forget," Mane said. "They died in the worst possible way water can kill anyone. All day I travelled by road to reach Ulhasnagar, where I took a shelter at a friends place. I was drenched and exhausted." Mane managed to get his phone charged from an inverter in a café and speak to his parents. The rain stopped only on the morning of July 28. He got home, covering the last bit of the distance in an autorickshaw. "I had lost all my key documents, including passport during that period. My shoes got torn, my legs were swollen. It took next eight days for my feet to recover. "Those were the two toughest days of my life. I just pray there is no repeat of the rains and the miseries." It was a wish many other Mumbaikars echoed fervently. PTI ENM MIN MIN
2017-08-29Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar remembers 2005 with dread - Economic Times
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar remembers 2005 with dread PTI|Updated: Aug 29, 2017, 07.48 PM IST MUMBAI: As the skies opened up and a city scurried for cover from torrential rain and high waves that came flooding in from the sea, memories of July 26, 2005 came back to haunt Captain Shivraj Mane, a Merchant Navy officer. That was the day 12 years ago when at least 500 people were killed, some electrocuted, other crushed under falling walls or drowned, with 94 cm of rain in a single day. That was also the day that Mane, like thousands of other Mumbaikars, began walking home through the flooded streets of Mumbai and its suburbs. He reached home in the distant Mumbai suburb of Ambarnath only on the third day. Being a navy man, he was used to water. But nothing had prepared him for the nightmare that was to come. He waded, "sans protection gear very unlike a naval officer", rode a buffalo on waterlogged stretches and saw human carcasses floating by, images imprinted vividly in his mind. It's a terrible sense of déjà vu, said the 31-year-old, reliving the day that every citizen of the Maximum City remembers with dread. "It was raining like any other monsoon day that day in Mumbai and Thane when I took a morning local train for Nerul (in Navi Mumbai) from Ambarnath for some official work," he recalled. By afternoon, he was done with work and should have been home in about two and half hours. It took two and a half days instead. "I was preoccupied with work and didn't realise what was happening outside. I realised only much later. I took a train from Nerul railway station on the Harbour Line, but it could not proceed beyond Tilak Nagar station, on my way to Kurla from where I had planned to take another local train for Ambarnath." So he chose to walk like other co-passengers along the track. When they reached Kurla, the magnitude of the destruction hit them. The railway tracks and platform had disappeared under water. "I opted to stay that night on a foot over-bridge like many others. I was stuck, but at a safer place. I, however, could not contact anyone at home to tell them about my whereabouts as my phone died. We were without food. "Sensing the magnitude of the calamity, the locals offered the commuters khichdi. That's Mumbai for you!" The next morning, on July 26, it was still raining and Mane walked on to Thane, 21 km away from Kurla. He was planning to reach Ambarnath via the Thane-Kalyan-Vithalwadi- Ulhasnagar route. "I did not opt to walk along rail tracks as the road was less waterlogged and a bit safer. Wherever and whenever it was possible, I took lifts to reach Thane and from there again covered a distance of around 25 km to reach Kongaon (in Kalyan taluka) by road." On his way to Ulhasnagar, he could see buffaloes coming out of a shed that had gone under water. "I rode one of the swimming buffaloes to cross the river and waterlogged roads to Vithalwadi. When I reached Ulhasnagar from Vitthalwadi, I could see dead bodies of slum dwellers living near a nullah floating in the water. It is a sight I will never forget," Mane said. "They died in the worst possible way water can kill anyone. All day I travelled by road to reach Ulhasnagar, where I took a shelter at a friend's place. I was drenched and exhausted." Mane managed to get his phone charged from an inverter in a café and speak to his parents. The rain stopped only on the morning of July 28. He got home, covering the last bit of the distance in an autorickshaw. "I had lost all my key documents, including passport during that period. My shoes got torn, my legs were swollen. It took next eight days for my feet to recover. "Those were the two toughest days of my life. I just pray there is no repeat of the rains and the miseries." It was a wish many other Mumbaikars echoed fervently.
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar remembers 2005 with dread - Economic Times
2017-08-29Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbai resident remembers the 2005 floods - The New Indian Express
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbai resident remembers the 2005 floods Published: 29th August 2017 07:54 PM Last Updated: 29th August 2017 11:02 PM MUMBAI: As the skies opened up and a city scurried for cover from torrential rain and high waves that came flooding in from the sea, memories of July 26, 2005 came back to haunt Captain Shivraj Mane, a Merchant Navy officer. That was the day 12 years ago when at least 500 people were killed, some electrocuted, other crushed under falling walls or drowned, with 94 cm of rain in a single day. That was also the day that Mane, like thousands of other Mumbaikars, began walking home through the flooded streets of Mumbai and its suburbs. He reached home in the distant Mumbai suburb of Ambarnath only on the third day. Being a navy man, he was used to water. But nothing had prepared him for the nightmare that was to come. He waded, "sans protection gear very unlike a naval officer", rode a buffalo on waterlogged stretches and saw human carcasses floating by, images imprinted vividly in his mind. It's a terrible sense of déjà vu, said the 31-year-old, reliving the day that every citizen of the Maximum City remembers with dread. "It was raining like any other monsoon day that day in Mumbai and Thane when I took a morning local train for Nerul (in Navi Mumbai) from Ambarnath for some official work," he recalled. By afternoon, he was done with work and should have been home in about two and half hours. It took two and a half days instead. "I was preoccupied with work and didn't realise what was happening outside. I realised only much later. I took a train from Nerul railway station on the Harbour Line, but it could not proceed beyond Tilak Nagar station, on my way to Kurla from where I had planned to take another local train for Ambarnath." So he chose to walk like other co-passengers along the track. When they reached Kurla, the magnitude of the destruction hit them. The railway tracks and platform had disappeared under water. "I opted to stay that night on a foot over-bridge like many others. I was stuck, but at a safer place. I, however, could not contact anyone at home to tell them about my whereabouts as my phone died. We were without food. "Sensing the magnitude of the calamity, the locals offered the commuters khichdi. That's Mumbai for you!" The next morning, on July 26, it was still raining and Mane walked on to Thane, 21 km away from Kurla. He was planning to reach Ambarnath via the Thane-Kalyan-VithalwadiUlhasnagar route. "I did not opt to walk along rail tracks as the road was less waterlogged and a bit safer. Wherever and whenever it was possible, I took lifts to reach Thane and from there again covered a distance of around 25 km to reach Kongaon (in Kalyan taluka) by road." On his way to Ulhasnagar, he could see buffaloes coming out of a shed that had gone under water. "I rode one of the swimming buffaloes to cross the river and waterlogged roads to Vithalwadi. When I reached Ulhasnagar from Vitthalwadi, I could see dead bodies of slum dwellers living near a nullah floating in the water. It is a sight I will never forget," Mane said. "They died in the worst possible way water can kill anyone. All day I travelled by road to reach Ulhasnagar, where I took a shelter at a friend's place. I was drenched and exhausted." Mane managed to get his phone charged from an inverter in a café and speak to his parents.The rain stopped only on the morning of July 28. He got home, covering the last bit of the distance in an autorickshaw. "I had lost all my key documents, including passport during that period. My shoes got torn, my legs were swollen. It took next eight days for my feet to recover. "Those were the two toughest days of my life. I just pray there is no repeat of the rains and the miseries." It was a wish many other Mumbaikars echoed fervently.
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbai resident remembers the 2005 floods - The New Indian Express
2017-08-29Man kills nephew for exposing his affair with sister-in-law, held - Times of India
Man kills nephew for exposing his affair with sister-in-law, held Aug 29, 2017, 06:10 IST TITWALA: Upset with his 18-year-old nephew for exposing his affair with his sister-in-law, a 45-year-old man stabbed the youth to death on Saturday night. He was arrested on Monday. The accused, identified as Mahesh Kumawat, is a resident of Ulhasnagar 1 and employed with a Dombivli-based chemical company .The police said the accused was having an illicit relationship with one of his sisters-in-law, who lived in the same locality . When the victim, Shubham, found out about their affair, he exposed the duo in front of the entire family . A meeting was held, where Mahesh was warned by the family elders to stop such behaviour immediately . Upset with the humiliation, a furious Mahesh decided to seek his vengeance. On Saturday night, he took the victim to Titwala on his bike, saying he wanted to bring some goods from there. He allegedly stabbed Shubham the same night. On Sunday morning, Titwala police was informed of a body being found.They began a probe.During questioning, Mahesh had told the police that he had last seen Shubham with his one of his friends at a nearby Ganpati mandal. Pradeep Kasbe, senior inspector of Titwala police station, said, "When we checked CCTV footage, we found Mahesh was lying and it was he himself taking Shubham from there." He added, "Mahesh has confessed to killing the victim."
Man kills nephew for exposing his affair with sister-in-law, held - Times of India
2017-08-29Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar ... - Business Standard
Carcasses floating, riding a buffalo to safety: A Mumbaikar Mumbai Last Updated at August 29, 2017 19:28 IST As the skies opened up and a city scurried for cover from torrential rain and high waves that came flooding in from the sea, memories of July 26, 2005 came back to haunt Captain Shivraj Mane, a Merchant Navy officer. That was the day 12 years ago when at least 500 people were killed, some electrocuted, other crushed under falling walls or drowned, with 94 cm of rain in a single day. That was also the day that Mane, like thousands of other Mumbaikars, began walking home through the flooded streets of Mumbai and its suburbs. He reached home in the distant Mumbai suburb of Ambarnath only on the third day. Being a navy man, he was used to water. But nothing had prepared him for the nightmare that was to come. He waded, "sans protection gear very unlike a naval officer", rode a buffalo on waterlogged stretches and saw human carcasses floating by, images imprinted vividly in his mind. It's a terrible sense of d?j? vu, said the 31-year-old, reliving the day that every citizen of the Maximum City remembers with dread. "It was raining like any other monsoon day that day in Mumbai and Thane when I took a morning local train for Nerul (in Navi Mumbai) from Ambarnath for some official work," he recalled. By afternoon, he was done with work and should have been home in about two and half hours. It took two and a half days instead. "I was preoccupied with work and didn't realise what was happening outside. I realised only much later. I took a train from Nerul railway station on the Harbour Line, but it could not proceed beyond Tilak Nagar station, on my way to Kurla from where I had planned to take another local train for Ambarnath." So he chose to walk like other co-passengers along the track. When they reached Kurla, the magnitude of the destruction hit them. The railway tracks and platform had disappeared under water. "I opted to stay that night on a foot over-bridge like many others. I was stuck, but at a safer place. I, however, could not contact anyone at home to tell them about my whereabouts as my phone died. We were without food. "Sensing the magnitude of the calamity, the locals offered the commuters khichdi. That's Mumbai for you!" The next morning, on July 26, it was still raining and Mane walked on to Thane, 21 km away from Kurla. He was planning to reach Ambarnath via the Thane-Kalyan-Vithalwadi- Ulhasnagar route. "I did not opt to walk along rail tracks as the road was less waterlogged and a bit safer. Wherever and whenever it was possible, I took lifts to reach Thane and from there again covered a distance of around 25 km to reach Kongaon (in Kalyan taluka) by road." On his way to Ulhasnagar, he could see buffaloes coming out of a shed that had gone under water. "I rode one of the swimming buffaloes to cross the river and waterlogged roads to Vithalwadi. When I reached Ulhasnagar from Vitthalwadi, I could see dead bodies of slum dwellers living near a nullah floating in the water. It is a sight I will never forget," Mane said. "They died in the worst possible way water can kill anyone. All day I travelled by road to reach Ulhasnagar, where I took a shelter at a friend's place. I was drenched and exhausted." Mane managed to get his phone charged from an inverter in a caf? and speak to his parents. The rain stopped only on the morning of July 28. He got home, covering the last bit of the distance in an autorickshaw. "I had lost all my key documents, including passport during that period. My shoes got torn, my legs were swollen. It took next eight days for my feet to recover. "Those were the two toughest days of my life. I just pray there is no repeat of the rains and the miseries."
2017-08-28Thane: Youth found hacked to death in Titwala - Free Press Journal
Thane: Youth found hacked to death in Titwala Aug 28, 2017 01:03 pm Thane: A youth was found dead with multiple stab wounds at Anebhisole village near Titwala in the district yesterday. Additional Superintendent of Police Prashant Kadam said the victim was identified as Subham Khanayalal Kumawat (18), resident of Ulhasnagar. The body, with veins of the neck and hands slit, was found on a dirt road near a farm in the village. His family members had lodged a missing person complaint with the Ulhasnagar police the previous night. According to the police, Kumawat, who worked in a saree shop, went out with some friends on Saturday night and didn’t return. Probe is underway.
Thane: Youth found hacked to death in Titwala - Free Press Journal
2017-08-27Class 9 Balbharati Textbook Says Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale Was ... - India.com
Class 9 Balbharati Textbook Says Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale Was a Terrorist Published: August 27, 2017 3:31 PM IST Mumbai, August 27: The Maharashtra State Bureau of Textbooks Production and Curriculum Research or Balbharati told the Bombay High Court that Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale, a militant leader of the Khalistan movement, has been mentioned as a terrorist in Class IX textbook only after much scrutiny. A petition in this regard, seeking the removal of the chapter from the textbook, has been filed by Ulhasnagar resident Amritpalsingh Khalsa, a report claimed. According to The Times of India, The affidavit by its director Sunil Magar mentions that petitioner’s claim that there is no document declaring Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale as a terrorist is incorrect. He also mentioned that Khalsa has mentioned in her petition that Bhindranwale was defending the Golden Temple against Operation Blue Star. The information in the textbook was put by Ganesh Raut, head of the history department, H V Desai College, Pune. Raut before writing the draft about Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale referred to many sources of history that include newspapers, periodicals, diaries, reference books, documents in the archives and encyclopaedia. In its reply to Khalsa’s petition, the board said that before any textbook is printed, there is meticulous planning and an elaborate procedure is done on any topic or subject. The reply also mentioned that before printing this information in the textbook, the draft written about Bhindranwale was reviewed by a separate history and civics study group comprising 30 renowned people.
Class 9 Balbharati Textbook Says Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale Was ... - India.com
2017-08-26Mandals still swear by Bollywood: Activists - The Asian Age
Mandals still swear by Bollywood: Activists Published Aug 27, 2017, 2:03 am IST Updated Aug 27, 2017, 2:03 am IST The mandals have been asked to use loudspeakers only to play aartis and devotional songs during the morning and evening hours.  According to activists, mandals have been seen blatantly playing film songs on dhols, even while crossing sensitive areas like hospitals. (File image of festivities in the city.) Mumbai: Ganesh Chaturthi celebrations have scaled down significantly after the governing body of all the mandals, Brihanmumbai Sarvajanik Ganeshutsav Samanvay Samiti (BSGSS), restricted all the mandals to discontinue using DJs and playing Bollywood songs during the festival. Thus, now the mandals have resorted to banjos and dhols to celebrate the festivals. However, activists allege that the mandals are blatantly playing Bollywood songs through dhols while crossing sensitive areas like hospitals. Awaaz Foundation, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) that works on environmental issues like noise pollution, received a few complaints on the first day of the festival itself wherein the residents complained about escalating noise levels. “We haven’t taken any reading about the noise levels yet, but we received 4-5 complaints on loud noise from areas like Girgaum, Parel and Bandra,” said Sumaira Abdulali, founder of Awaaz Foundation.   Meanwhile, it has been also observed that the mandals continue to stick to Bollywood songs. “Although the mandals are restricted to play Bollywood music, they are using their banjos and dhols to play filmy songs. I heard Marathi song beats being played on the first day at a hospital in Ulhasnagar,” said Sarita Khanchandani, an environment activist from Ulhasnagar.   However, the BSGSS has warned all the mandals that if residents file a complaint about a mandal flouting rules, that particular mandal will be pulled by the body. “We have already gave them a warning. There are also police officials to keep a watch on such mandals. If they face any police action, then we will not help them,” said BSGSS president Naresh Dahibhawkar. The mandals have been asked to use loudspeakers only to play aartis and devotional songs during the morning and evening hours.
Mandals still swear by Bollywood: Activists - The Asian Age
2017-08-25Bail denied to person accused of filing false rape case - Oherald
Bail denied to person accused of filing false rape case PANJIM: The Additional Sessions Judge at Mapusa has rejected the bail application of one Hiro Kewalramani, a co-accused and one of the alleged conspirators in a false rape case filed at Anjuna Police Station against one Kishore Keswani, a resident of Ulhas Nagar in Pune. Team Herald PANJIM: The Additional Sessions Judge at Mapusa has rejected the bail application of one Hiro Kewalramani, a co-accused and one of the alleged conspirators in a false rape case filed at Anjuna Police Station against one Kishore Keswani, a resident of Ulhas Nagar in Pune. According to the case details, Kewalramani was arrested on May 5, 2017 following a complaint filed by Keswani whereby Kewalramani and others were charged with having hatched a criminal conspiracy by creating a false story of rape. Kewalramani is also charged with fabricating documents and forging signatures on a hotel register in the name of Keswani. The court, while rejecting the bail application, observed that the offence is serious of a nature since it was a well-planned criminal conspiracy to file a false case. Adv Galileo Teles, appearing for Keswani relied upon a Bombay High Court order that took judicial notice of the fact that because of such false complaints, ‘genuine victims of rape and sexual harassment are viewed with jaundiced eye’. The court also rejected the submissions of the advocate for Kewalramani that he was entitled to bail on account of change in circumstance upon filing of indictment. In February 2016, a girl had approached Anjuna Police Station with a complaint that she was raped in a hotel allegedly by Keswani. The police had also registered an offence and during the investigation, it was revealed that Keswani was in Mumbai at the time of the alleged incident. Anjuna Police also gathered evidence that showed that Keswani had attended a wedding at Ulhasnagar on February 10, 2016 and was thereafter present at the Head office of Chandan and Chandan Advocates based on CCTV footage obtained from the office. Anjuna Police also carried out an identification parade wherein the manager and staff of the Goan Darbar Hotel could not identify Keswani who was alleged to have stayed with the girl. Keswani then approached the local police lodging a case against Kewalramani and his associates for filing a fake case against him. The girl had also confessed that she was promised by Kewalramani’s wife to hide facts for which the former would be paid Rs 5-10 lakh.
2017-08-24Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation tax chief ousted over graft charges - Mid-Day
Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation tax chief ousted over graft charges Thane | Posted 24-Aug-2017 Corruption charges regarding property tax collection have led to the ouster of Yuvraj Badane, assistant municipal commissioner in the Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation (UMC), as the head of the tax collection department. UMC chief Rajendra Nimbalkar on Monday took away the charge from Badane, who will now only look after the public relations department. “We gave the charge to some other person. It was due to some administrative issue,” Nimbalkar told mid-day. The controversy emerged earlier this month, when it was found that an employee of the tax collection department had collected a mere Rs 10 lakh in property tax from a wine shop - which owed Rs 70 lakh - by showing the area of the store much lesser than its actual expanse. Discrepancy in tax The store is Bhagwati Wines, located in Shriram Chowk, which occupies an area of around 8,000 sq metres. mid-day reported about the same in the August 9 story ‘UMC has a Brutus in its midst’. However, those in charge of collecting tax showed the area as a mere 400 sq metres. When Badane was heading the department, he’d visited the shop and put up a notice asking the owner to pay R70 lakh in dues after seeing that it was a ground plus two-storey building.The discrepancy occurred while Badane was on leave and tax inspector DL Magar was tasked with recovering the amount. Magar allegedly forged documents to show only Rs 10 lakh in tax. When Badane returned, he initiated an inquiry and asked for an explanation. Magar claimed he’d been pressured by UMC employee Dada Patil and RPI corporator Bhagwan Bhalerao to do the billing in that manner. Corporator chatter Later, the commissioner initiated an inquiry against tax department employees and Bhalerao. Senior politicians and corporators were discussing how to raise the issue during the general body meeting. “Corporators were going to raise question about Badane, who they allege is also corrupt. There is not a single property tax collection case in which employees have not misused their power. They were going to demand an inquiry and ask for his suspension,” said sources. But, Nimbalkar went one step further and took away Badane’s charge, assigning the job to another official instead.
Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation tax chief ousted over graft charges - Mid-Day
2017-08-24The making of Bombay's mini Sindh - Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations
The making of Bombay’s mini Sindh 24 AUGUST 2017 Many of the Hindu Sindhi refugees who fled to India post Partition succeeded in rebuilding their lives afresh, their native entrepreneurial spirit enabling them to rise up from the destitution that displacement caused. Ulhasnagar, Thane district, which was a refugee camp 70 years ago, is a microcosm of how the community rehabilitated itself--with the help of a well dispersed and generous Sindhi trading network This is the second in a four-part series on Partition. Read the first one here, and the next one here. Ulhasnagar, a township in Thane district, Mumbai Metropolitan Region, located 58 km to the north west of Mumbai city, was once a Hindu Sindhi refugee camp. Today, it’s a concentration of low-slung dwellings and unplanned high-rises, spread over 13 sq km and bursting at the seams with 8 lakh people, of which less than half are Sindhis today. Remnants of the military barracks, used during the Second World War and then converted into dormitory-style shelters for the refugees who arrived by sea in 1947-48, are still visible and many continue to live where they were born in Ulhasnagar’s Sectors 1 to 5, such as Hardas Makhijaa, a former mayor of Ulhasnagar[1]. He was four months old when he came to what was earlier known as the Kalyan Camp, from Kumbar Taluka (Larkana District), and now has his office in the very place he grew up: Camp 2, Nehru Chowk. His late father, Sanmukh Duromal Makhija, a freedom fighter, was the founder of the Sindhi newspaper, Azaadi, in 1942, and among the few who visited the Camp before bringing his family to settle there.The most attractive aspect of the Kalyan Camp (renamed as the new township of Ulhasnagar by Governor General C. Rajagopalachari on 8 August 1949), was its proximity to Bombay—even if it had no roads, water taps, flour mills, electricity or sanitation facilities, recalls Hardas Makhijaa. Other camps, like the one in Pune, to which refugees arriving at Bombay port were also sent, were considered too far away for the city’s business and employment opportunities.Sarla Kripalani, author of the book, Aaya Pir, Bhagga Mir and Other Sindhi Proverbs (2012), remembers her father-in-law’s nieces living in a refugee camp beyond the Kalyan Camp. “We visited them often. He told them he could help them, but he was being pragmatic when he also said that they should not depend on him entirely,” she adds. “These girls were so good at embroidery work, making achaar (pickle), papads, and mithai (sweetmeats) at home, that the younger sister would call on well-to-do Sindhi families, like the Advanis of Blue Star in the city, to sell their wares.” According to Kripalani, Sindhi girls began working after their migration to India, and only because their families were in dire financial straits. In Sindh, most Hindu families belonged to the urban middle class, while the wealthy few were zamindars (landowners), well established merchants and bankers, or employed in key positions in the British colonial government. In spite of displacement from their homeland in 1947-48, there were two reasons why the success of this community was almost a certainty. The Shikarpuri Sindhis from the land-bound city of Shikarpur, Sindh, in particular, had a pre-colonial global trading and financial network that extended from Astrakhan on the Caspian Sea to the Straits of Malacca.[2] It was this community of merchants and bankers who introduced and popularised the promissory note, known as the Hundi. According to Sindhi anthropologist and author Nandita Bhavnani, “This network was dealt a blow by the Great Game (late 19th C) in Central Asia by the competing powers of Imperial Russia and Great Britain, jostling for influence. And ultimately by the Russian Revolution when many Shikarpuris were ruined, as they had large holdings of Russian roubles.”[3] Sindhis classify themselves by their city of origin, being a mostly urban community, such as the Amils and Bhaibands from Hyderabad, Sindh; the Shikarpuris; or the Thattai Bhatia merchants (from the city of Thatta, a former capital of Southern Sindh). Sometimes, they had more generic names, like Uttaradi (a resident of Northern Sindh). The Bhaibands (lit. ‘brothers in arms’)[4] were traders, and it wasn’t long before they built new business networks, connecting colonial port cities. Initially, with the Central Asian markets disrupted by political instability in the late 19th century, and native kingdoms impoverished by British rule, they began selling ‘Sindh work’ (ivory, wood and enamel carving, lacquer work, textiles and embroidery made by Sindhi Muslim artisans) to British soldiers, who turned out to be a ready market: they called them the Sindhworkis. These Sindhworkis began travelling abroad from the late 1850s and early 1860s, eastwards to Canton (Guangzhou), Hong Kong, Japan, and westwards to Cairo, Malta, Gibraltar, and the Caribbean islands.[5] What is interesting is that before Partition the men travelled for two or three years, leaving their families home. Often, there was a sethia (boss), who set out with a group of young men from his family and an extended friends’ circle. They traded across the seas, meeting not just the demand for Sindh work, but selling Malta lace in Japan, and vice versa: Japanese curios in Malta.It was this bedrock of relatives abroad, along with home-grown success stories from the camps themselves (like the owners of the Colaba-headquartered Kailash Parbhat restaurants, who once lived in the Kalyan Camp), who donated towards educational, social, business and community infrastructure within the camps. Many of the young men left the camps to seek their fortunes abroad, only returning to collect their families. However, many have flourished in the numerous home, cottage, small, and medium scale manufacturing units, and trading businesses in Ulhasnagar that now service the Indian market. The Sindhi influence in Bombay Most old-timers in the city vividly remember young Sindhi boys hawking knick-knacks, trinkets, and eatables made in Ulhasnagar, on trains running between Ambarnath and V.T. Stations (now Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus). Much before Chinese goods came to be manufactured at cheap rates, the Sindhis at Ulhasnagar were making just about anything at less than half the market price. Although, these goods were pejoratively referred to as “Made in USA” (lit. Ulhasnagar Sindhi Association), they met the demands of a vast price-sensitive Indian market–and do so even today. Trade in jeans, confectionery, pre-fabricated furniture, paper and textiles are some goods over which this township still has an edge.[6] The Sindhis are also attributed with popularising the concept of the co-operative housing society in Bombay. According to Bhavnani, in 1914, Bombay got its first residential co-operative society at Gamdevi pioneered by Rao Bahadur S. S. Talmaki, a Maharashtrian, but Sindhi housing societies, like Navjivan Society[7], and Nanik Nivas and Shyam Nivas at Warden Road [8], which were all built during the 1950s, set up a new paradigm for community housing. Bombay had been dominated until then by the tenancy model. It is in the spheres of philanthropy and education in Bombay that the contribution of this community is noteworthy. Much after the imprint left by 19th and early 20th-century merchants, such as Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy and the Tatas, and prior to the corporate philanthropy practised today, was the establishment from the 1950s to 1980s of Sindhi hospitals, like Jaslok and Hinduja, and educational institutions, such as Jaihind, Kishinchand Chellaram, and National Colleges. Ulhasnagar, and the parent city of Mumbai, are rightfully called ‘mini Sindh’ because this city is today the headquarters of a community with a worldwide presence.
The making of Bombay
2017-08-23Mumbai among 17 most-polluted: Minister - The Hindu
Mumbai among 17 most-polluted: Minister MUMBAI, AUGUST 23, 2017 00:00 IST UPDATED: AUGUST 23, 2017 04:27 IST According to the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), Mumbai features among the 17 most-polluted cities in the State and 123 cities in the country, said Pravin Pote-Patil, Minister of State for Environment, on Tuesday. 2022 agenda “Navi Mumbai too figures in the list, and the State intends to make Maharashtra pollution-free by 2022 by adopting various pollution control measures,” he said at a one-day workshop on ‘Clean Air Maharashtra Resolve 2022’. “The main contributors to the air pollution are vehicles and factories.” As per the State’s economic survey for 2017, the total number of vehicles (all category) registered is 2.93 crore. This includes 2.14 crore motorcycles, 41.51 lakh cars and jeeps, 2.18 lakh taxis, 7.44 lakh autorickshaws, 14.98 lakh lorries, 24,910 school buses, 3.96 lakh trailers, and 6.39 lakh tractors. As per the economic survey, the number of registered industrial units in 2014-15 was 28,601. Monitoring systems Later, speaking to reporters, the Minister clarified that the reason behind so many cities being identified as having poor air quality is because the State has set up air quality monitoring systems in 72 places, unlike Gujarat, where there is just one such unit. “Of the 72 units, 10-12 units monitor the air quality on a daily basis and seven units do so on a weekly basis,” said Mr. Pote-Patil. The other cities marked as having poor air quality by the CPCB include Badlapur, Nagpur, Nashik, Pune and Ulhasnagar. Solar power According to the Minister, the government aims to implement solar power policy in the industries wherein they will make the initial investment of installing solar panels by 2019. The industries will get a 30% concession in electricity bills and after 15 years, these solar power generating units will be handed over to the industries. “The average life of these solar power generating units is around 40 years. The industries will enjoy free power for the next 35 years.” He also said that the municipal corporations should allocate 25% of their budgetary allocations towards pollution control measures. He argued that the ‘Odd and Even’ formula for cars in Mumbai will not work.
2017-08-22Year after town planner went missing, mayor asks for new appointment - Times of India
Year after town planner went missing, mayor asks for new appointment Aug 22, 2017, 11:38 AM IST ULHASNAGAR: One year after a 53-year-old town planner, Sanjeev Karpe of UMC, (Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation) went missing, the UMC Mayor Meena Ailani now have demanded the state government to immediately appoint a new town planner as all new projects are not getting sanctioned in the city due to which civic body's revenue is badly affected. Ailani have written letter to the State Town planning department and Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis.Talking to TOI, Ailani said, "The civic body have very few source of income and Town planning department is one of crucial department for source of income and in absence of Town Planner for a year our civic body is facing financial crisis due to which development work is also badly affected". Ailani also demanded that police should speed up investigation to search Karpe or should hand over case to some higher authority. Last year on August 20, Sanjeev Karpe had went missing from Borghat area of Pune Express on his way to attened Town Planning department's meeting in Pune. The Khapoli police who has registered kidnapping case in to matter is still not sucesss to trace him. In past too, officials from civic body had demanded the state government for appointment of new town planner but no decision was taken.
Year after town planner went missing, mayor asks for new appointment - Times of India
2017-08-21BJP sweeps Mira-Bhayander municipal polls, continuing Maharashtra victory run - Livemint
BJP sweeps Mira-Bhayander municipal polls, continuing Maharashtra victory run Of the 95 seats, the BJP won 61 in the Mira-Bhayander municipal polls, nearly doubling its 2012 tally of 31 Last Published: Tue, Aug 22 2017. 02 22 AM IST Mumbai: Continuing its victory run in Maharashtra, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) on Monday swept the polls to the Mira-Bhayander Municipal Corporation in the Mumbai metropolitan region. Of the 95 seats, the BJP won 61, nearly doubling its 2012 tally of 31. The Shiv Sena came second with 22 seats and the Congress won 10. The Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) could not open its account. Chief minister Devendra Fadnavis and Shiv Sena president Uddhav Thackeray campaigned heavily in the elections, virtually carrying on with the BJP-Sena acrimony seen in the Mumbai civic elections earlier this year. To be sure, the Sena gained 7 seats over its 2012 tally of 15, but it failed to score over the BJP in a straight fight yet again. The results marked a sharp anti-climax in the NCP and the Congress fortunes—the NCP had won 26 seats in 2012 and the Congress 18. The Mira-Bhayander township on the western tip of Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR) has a large North Indian, Gujarati and Jain population that has shuffled between the Congress-NCP and the BJP over the years. The Marathi population has largely stayed with the Shiv Sena. The victory is significant for the ruling BJP in Maharashtra since it decided to contest the civic polls on its own in keeping with its strategy for municipal and zilla parishad (district councils) elections held earlier this year. It is also a pointer to the BJP’s consolidation in the MMR in three years since the 2014 Lok Sabha elections. In the 2014 Lok Sabha polls, the BJP-Shiv Sena alliance won all five seats from Greater Mumbai, which is part of the MMR, with the BJP getting three. The BJP went alone in the October 2014 assembly polls in the state and won 15 of the 36 assembly seats in Greater Mumbai. The Sena won 14 and Congress 5. This year in February, the BJP jumped from 31 seats in 2012 to 82 in the elections to the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) and the Sena won 84. In the municipal elections in nine other cities in February 2017 also, the BJP was the single largest party in Pune, Nashik, Nagpur, Pimpri-Chinchwad, Amravati, Akola, Solapur and Ulhasnagar. This year in May, the BJP also swept elections to the Panvel Municipal Corporation (also in MMR) and the Shiv Sena failed to open its account. For chief minister Fadnavis, who holds the urban development portfolio, the victory in Mira-Bhayander comes as yet another endorsement of his development agenda which was the central theme of the BJP’s campaign in this township. Fadnavis tweeted that the victory was “because of the wave of vishwas and vikaas (faith and development) created by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the efforts of team BJP”. BJP’s Mumbai unit chief Ashish Shelar was more direct in his attack on the Shiv Sena, saying that poll after poll in the state are a demonstration of the BJP’s rise and they showed the real power of “those who have illusions about their strength”. Shiv Sena leader and Maharashtra transport minister Diwakar Raote hit back saying Shiv Sena had resolved to fight each election in the state on its own. “Like the Marathas rose after the Panipat loss, Shiv Sena will also rise once again,” he said.
BJP sweeps Mira-Bhayander municipal polls, continuing Maharashtra victory run - Livemint
2017-08-21People reposed faith in development work: CM Devendra Fadnavis - The Indian Express
People reposed faith in development work: CM Devendra Fadnavis “The Mira-Bhayander victory is the trust people have reposed in development works of the government. It is a mandate for vikas and vishwas," Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis said. Mumbai | Published:August 22, 2017 4:16 am Following its victory in the Mira-Bhayander civic polls, the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) on Monday gave credit to the government's development plank for successive electoral victories in the municipal corporations, zilla parishads and municipal councils across Maharashtra. "The Mira-Bhayander victory is the trust people have reposed in development works of the government. It is a mandate for vikas and vishwas. My government is committed to fulfill the aspirations of people by expediting the development projects," Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis said. He also attributed the success in the satellite town to team work. The victory in Mira-Bhayander has established the ruling BJP as a leading political force in the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR) encompassing nine civic bodies including Mumbai, Kalyan-Dombivali, Panvel, Ulhasnagar, Navi Mumbai, Bhiwandi, Thane and Vasai-Virar. The party has edged out the political dominance of the Shiv Sena, which is left with a majority in only Thane. Apart from Mira-Bhayander, BJP has majority in Panvel and Ulhasnagar (along with a local party). The BJP, in alliance with the Sena, is in power in Kalyan-Dombivali and Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation. However, the Shiv Sena had supported the Congress in Navi Mumbai. In Vasai Virar the leading party is the Bahujan Vikas Party. The BJP, which is planning to contest the assembly elections alone in 2019, believes the consolidation of party in the MMR would help them in the assembly elections. BJP political managers said, "If we look at all the elections held in the last 34 months in zilla parishads and municipal corporations across Maharashtra, Fadnavis has struck to the development plank. The paradigm shift in politics has helped the BJP to connect to the generation next voters giving the party huge leads." "In Mira-Bhayander, two projects that turned the tide in favour of BJP was the Metro and Surya dam. It concerned drinking water and transport issues, most crucial for people in the township," said the party's political managers. Another significant point cited was that the development plank has helped the party in new-age social engineering to get people across caste, community and religion to its fold. The 60 seats would not have been possible without the support of Christians, the party believes. So far, the BJP has in its kitty almost all major civic bodies including Pune, Pimpri-Chinchwad, Solapur, Nashik, Akola, Amravati, and Nagpur. In elections to zilla parishads too, the BJP tally reveals a threefold increase
People reposed faith in development work: CM Devendra Fadnavis - The Indian Express
2017-08-20Mira-Bhaynder civic polls: 4-way battle likely to spring surprise wins, results on Monday - Hindustan Times
Mira-Bhayander civic polls:?Battle between Shiv Sena, BJP, Congress, NCP may spring surprise wins, results on Monday About 509 candidates are in the fray for 95 seats; 47% voter turnout recorded MUMBAI Updated: Aug 21, 2017 13:05 IST The fight for Mira-Bhayander Municipal Corporation (MBMC) is likely to be a close contest. The four-way battle between the Shiv Sena, BJP, Congress and NCP is likely to reduce victory margins and spring a surprise wins. The civic poll held on Sunday saw 47% voter turnout, which was 52% in 2012. Mira-Bhayander has a population of 8.4 lakh. About 509 candidates are in the fray for 95 seats, results for which will be declared on Monday. The voting started with a low turn-out in the morning and continued at snail’s pace throughout the day. By 12pm, the voting percentage was just 14%. It touched 36% by 3.30pm, said a senior official from state election commission. JS Saharia, state election commissioner, said, “The average voting percentage for MBMC elections is 47%. Counting will start tomorrow morning and results will be declared by evening.” Before being ruled by the Sena-BJP combine, the MBMC was?a Congress-NCP bastion. However, the tenure of the saffron allies has been fraught with tiffs. The most prominent being the BJP’s decision to enforce an eight-day meat ban during the Jain festival of Paryushan. Moreover, after winning 10 municipal corporations earlier this year the BJP is looking to better its count by retaining the MBMC. Once a Congress-NCP bastion, today Mira-Bhyander has the highest number of BJP corporators and an MLA?in Narendra Mehta. With nine civic corporations, including Mumbai, in the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR), the saffron allies are leaving no stone unturned to outdo each other. While the Sena-BJP combine rules the Kalyan civic body, the Sena has an upper hand in Mumbai and Thane. While Congress retained Bhiwandi-Nizampur civic body, the NCP held on to Navi Mumbai. The BJP controls Panvel civic body and shares power with local parties in Ulhasnagar and Vasai-Virar corporations.
Mira-Bhaynder civic polls: 4-way battle likely to spring surprise wins, results on Monday - Hindustan Times
2017-08-19Pantograph parts of Karjat-CST train wound three commuters at ... - The Asian Age
Pantograph parts of Karjat-CST train wound three commuters at Ambernath Aug 20, 2017, 2:23 am IST Updated : Aug 20, 2017, 2:23 am IST Three passengers were injured: Kamlesh Hargun Das Vadhwani (45) from Ulhasnagar, Vinay Baba Sahab Bedekar (17) and Sachin Janardan (32). Mumbai: In a freak accident on Saturday afternoon, a pantograph of a Karjat-Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (CST) train came apart when it got entangled in the overhead wire and the pieces of the same hit four passengers of the train travelling in its luggage compartment as well a passengers from an opposite train at Ambernath. A pantograph is an apparatus mounted on the roof of an electric train to collect power through contact with an overhead wire. The incident occurred between 2.30 pm and 3 pm on Saturday and caused 20 trains to be cancelled while the injured were rushed to Kalyan railway hospital, to tend to their injuries. Three passengers were injured: Kamlesh Hargun Das Vadhwani (45) from Ulhasnagar, Vinay Baba Sahab Bedekar (17) and Sachin Janardan (32). It is still not certain exactly what happened, but railway officials have said that they will look into how an incident like this does on repeat itself.
Pantograph parts of Karjat-CST train wound three commuters at ... - The Asian Age
2017-08-18Uddhav Thackeray meets party leaders, says Shiv Sena ready for any elections - India Today
Uddhav Thackeray meets party leaders, says Shiv Sena ready for any elections After meeting party members, Uddhav said that his party is preparing for the Lok Sabha and Vidhan Sabha polls. Mumbai, August 18, 2017 | UPDATED 20:42 IST While announcing region wise key responsibilities to top party leaders Shiv Sena Party president Uddhav Thackeray today said that his party is ready to face any election. Uddhav had met to party leaders at the party headquarters - Shiv Sena Bhawan in Mumbai. After the meeting Uddhav said that his party is preparing for the Lok Sabha and Vidhan Sabha polls. The party announced that Diwakr Raote will be in-charge for Vidharbha, Ramdas Kadam for Marathawada, Gajanan Kirtikar for Western Maharashtra, Subhash Desai for Konkan while Sanjay Raut will be in-charge for northern Maharashtra. "Whenever the elections take place, we are ready to take anyone heads on," Uddhav told media persons after the meeting. On being reminded that the NDA constituents had decided to fight the 2019 elections under the leadership of Narendra Mod in a meeting in Delh, Uddhav said, "But we have not started any talks on mission 360+, NDA allies should think over it." Uddhav also added that he did not consider anyone his enemy. The Shiv Sena president also demanded transparency in farmer loan waiver. "We want a complete list of all 89 lakh farmers with name and addresses who will benefit from loan waiver. List should be presented in the assembly," he demanded. Uddhav also targeted Goa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar over his alleged remarks of returning as Defence Minister if he loses Panaji by polls. "The Chief Minister of Maharashtra says that there will be anarchy if they announce complete loan waiver. But I feel if people like Parrikar go back as Defence Minister there will be anarchy," Uddhav said. Meanwhile, Mumbai BJP President Ashish Shelar lashed out at Shiv Sena president over his election speech in Mira Bhayander. "Uddhav's speech is a case of hipocrisy. They lost in Mumbai and Ulhasnagar and it will be repeated in Mira Bhayander. Have they forgotten that they scored a duck in Panvel Municipal polls," said Shelar.
Uddhav Thackeray meets party leaders, says Shiv Sena ready for any elections - India Today
2017-08-18Bombay High Court to hear petitions against no silence zones ahead of Ganesh Chaturthi - India Today
Bombay High Court to hear petitions against no silence zones ahead of Ganesh Chaturthi The Union government has amended the noise pollution rules which came into effect from August 10- now, there will be no silence zones in the country unless the state government notifies one as. Mumbai, August 19, 2017 | UPDATED 07:53 IST The Bombay High Court is gearing up to hear petitions on noise pollution after the Central government amended noise pollution regulations. One of the petitioners, activist Sumaira Abdulali, who runs an organisation called Awaaz Foundation said, "This one amendment has taken us 17 years back. Currently, we are discussing with our lawyers on how to put forth our case in court." The division bench headed by Justice Abhay Oka has been hearing a number of petitions on noise pollution that were filed in the past few years. Justice Oka on Friday adjourned the hearing of a petition about Ulhasnagar, a municipal corporation in Thane district, saying, "We will hear the case further on 22nd as we anyway have to hear the case on amendment brought by Central government." The Union government has amended the noise pollution rules which came into effect from August 10- now, there will be no silence zones in the country unless the state government notifies one as. The case in Ulhasnagar pertains to various violations, not just of noise pollution, but also of pandals being erected for the forthcoming Ganpati festivities. Petitioner Sarita Khanchandani pointed out to the court that one such pandal which was built on road affects the traffic severely. She also told the court that there was not just one but many such pandals in the city that are choking the roads. ILLEGAL GANPATI PANDALS TO BE TAKEN DOWN The court asked Khanchandani to complain about the pandals to the Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation. Justice Oka asked, "Once the idol of Ganpati is inside the pandal, will the authorities be able to remove it?" With this the court ordered the civic body to remove that one pandal about which Khanchandani had provided photographic evidence, by Saturday afternoon (August 19). The advocate appearing for the Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation admitted that pandals erected were without permission. Justice Oka then asked the authorities to remove them before the festival and take action against those responsible for erecting illegal pandals. Meanwhile, the corporation's lawyer said that three telephone numbers have been put up for the citizens of Ulhasnagar to complain about high noise levels during festivities apart from 9969365100, a WhatsApp number to register complaints. The court asked the petitioners to check if these were of any help, in addition to asking the Ulhasnagar Police to specify the names of the officers who are responsible for noise pollution control. The police has been asked to submit a report of the total number of sound meters that they possessed to measure decibel levels before taking any action. All the petitions concerning noise pollution have been put forth for a hearing on August 22.
Bombay High Court to hear petitions against no silence zones ahead of Ganesh Chaturthi - India Today
2017-08-18Ulhas, Waldhuni rivers have almost died due to pollution, SC ... - Hindustan Times
Ulhas, Waldhuni rivers have almost died due to pollution, SC blames Maharashtra government A court order from August 14, which was published on Friday, said that there was ‘absolutely no coordination between authorities to protect the rivers’. MUMBAI Updated: Aug 19, 2017 00:32 IST The Supreme Court (SC) rapped the state government for allowing the Ulhas and Waldhuni rivers to degrade gradually because of pollution. A court order from August 14, which was published on Friday, said that there was ‘absolutely no coordination between authorities to protect the rivers’. The court asked the principal secretary, state environment department and member secretary of the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board (MPCB) to be present in person during the next hearing on September 18.“We require their presence because the order passed by the National Green Tribunal (NGT) shows that there is absolutely no coordination between authorities to protect the Ulhas and Waldhuni rivers,” read the order passed by the court. “It is clear in the order that these rivers are more or less dead due to pollution.” The western bench of the NGT passed an order in July 2015 held Dombivili Industries Association (DBESA), Ulhas Nagar Municipal Corporation, the Kalyan Dombivili Municipal Corporation, the Ambarnath Municipal Council and others guilty of polluting Ulhas river with untreated effluents. The judgement imposed a penalty of Rs96 crore to restore the river. The SC, however, said that the penalty amounts may not be deposited at this stage. The court also ordered the two state government officers to appear before the court only after taking stock of the revival plan for the rivers after consulting the director, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, concerned authorities from the National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur and the National Institute of Oceanography. In 2012, NGO Vanashakti filed a petition with the NGT to direct the MPCB to shut all polluting industries discharging untreated effluents into the Ulhas river.In July 2015, the government agencies moved the Bombay high court (HC), which stayed the tribunal’s order of depositing the fine. On July 5, the SC passed an order staying the HC judgement. The apex court on July 17 directed the respondents to pay the fine and said that the civic bodies and the industries have the option of either filing a review in NGT or take the matter to the SC itself, within three weeks. The respondents chose the latter. The current SC order was in light of a special leave petition filed by Vanashakti in the SC, challenging the HC’s decision. ENVIRONMENTALISTS SPEAK “We are thankful that the SC has realised the seriousness of the pollution problem faced by these rivers and understood the buck passing by authorities over the past two years. The different tactics will come to an end. After a five-year struggle, the river will get a new lease of life,” said Stalin D, director, NGO Vanashakti and petitioner. AUTHORITIES SPEAK “Rejuvenation of both rivers (Ulhas and Waldhuni) is underway. Our priority is to first treat the sewage at these rivers and bring the water quality to permissible standards. Secondly, NEERI and IIT-B had submitted their draft plans for restoration and we had incorporated our opinion. Now, the final plan will be issued soon and the restoration will begin. We will be telling the court details of the same,” said P Anbalagan, member secretary, MPCB. RESPONDENTS SPEAK “We are happy that SC has stayed the penalty as of now. We will be presenting our version of revival and restoration of these water bodies during the next hearing and hope to get relief,” said a senior official from Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation.
Ulhas, Waldhuni rivers have almost died due to pollution, SC ... - Hindustan Times
2017-08-17Report: 15% brothels provide minors for sex in Mumbai - NewsBytes
Report: 15% brothels provide minors for sex in Mumbai 17 Aug 2017 Minors form a major part of India's sex trade. A report by IJM and Maharashtra Commission for the Protection of Child Rights claims at least 15% of Mumbai's commercial sex establishments offer underage women for pleasure. In 2015, the NCRB noted trafficking of minors had increased a shocking 14 times last decade. The conditions the girls are subjected to are indeed horrifying.
Report: 15% brothels provide minors for sex in Mumbai - NewsBytes
2017-08-17Child labour: Rescued minor from dies in hospital - The Indian Express
Child labour: Rescued minor from dies in hospital According to doctors at KEM hospital where the boy was admitted on Wednesday, he suffered from abdominal pain and was in advanced stage of respiratory distress. Published:August 18, 2017 3:00 am A minor found engaged in child labour and rescued by Thane police succumbed on Wednesday to acute respiratory distress syndrome in a Parel hospital. The boy, from Jharkhand, was one of 16 kids rescued in Thane by police where they had reportedly been trafficked for child labour. He was in Ulhasnagar shelter home for last four months under care of Child Welfare Committee. According to doctors at KEM hospital where the boy was admitted on Wednesday, he suffered from abdominal pain and was in advanced stage of respiratory distress. He was tested negative for leptospirosis. Doctors treating him said he suffered from acute respiratory distress syndrome and was put on medication and given symptomatic treatment. By Wednesday night, he had passed away. His parents are in Jharkhand and the body was taken to KEM for autopsy. Doctors added that his condition was critical at the time of admission and the boy had no company during his treatment.
2017-08-14Dahi Handi celebrations: Male Govindas dismiss worries of height restrictions, say proper safety measures are key - Mumbai Mirror
DAHI HANDI CELEBRATIONS: MALE GOVINDAS DISMISS WORRIES OF HEIGHT RESTRICTIONS, SAY PROPER SAFETY MEASURES ARE KEY Mumbai Mirror | Updated: Aug 14, 2017, 07.04 PM IST Priyamvada Mangal The practice was due to start at 10 pm on Saturday, but it starts raining. About 70 men from the Prem Nagar Sports Club Mandal wait under an awning for the rain to stop. They want to start their Dahi Handi practice. They cannot miss a day, as they are just three days away from the festival. The rain stops at 10:40 pm and the warm up exercises finally begin. One of the most popular festivals celebrated in India, Dahi Handi is facing criticism as Govindas who form the human pyramid often suffer serious falls that leave them injured, sometimes even fatally. The state government recently announced that children below the age of 14 years will not be allowed to be a part of the pyramid. The Bombay High Court, on the other hand, dismissed a petition seeking to limit the height of a pyramid to 20 feet, saying that accidents will happen anywhere, "even in toilets". Activists, on the other hand, cite statistics like how one Govinda died and 202 were injured in 2014 in Mumbai alone. Last year, a 12-year-old Govinda fell from the top of a six-level pyramid in Ulhasnagar and had to be rushed to the hospital
Dahi Handi celebrations: Male Govindas dismiss worries of height restrictions, say proper safety measures are key - Mumbai Mirror
2017-08-13कामगार विमा रुग्णालयाचा पुनर्विकास होणार
कामगार विमा रुग्णालयाचा पुनर्विकास होणार Maharashtra Times | Updated: Aug 14, 2017, 03:00AM IST कामगार राज्य विमा महासंचालकांचे आश्वासन म. टा. वृत्तसेवा, उल्हासनगर उल्हासनगर शहरात असलेल्या राज्य सरकारच्या सेंट्रल आणि कामगार विमा रुग्णालयाला सध्या अनेक समस्यांनी घेरले आहे. कामगार विमा रुग्णालयाची इमारत धोकादायक स्थितीत उभी असल्याने या इमारतीच्या पुनर्विकासासाठी खासदार डॉ. श्रीकांत शिंदे यांनी नुकतीच कामगार राज्य विमा योजनेचे महासंचालक राजकुमार यांची भेट घेतली. राज्य सरकारचा सविस्तर अहवाल येताच इमारतीच्या पुनर्विकासाचा प्रश्न मार्गी लावण्याचे आश्वासन त्यांनी दिल्याचे खासदार डॉ. शिंदे यांनी सांगितले. उल्हासनगर येथील सामान्य रुग्णांसाठी सेंट्रल रुग्णालय आणि कामगार विमा रुग्णालय यांचा कामगार वर्गाला मोठा आधार असतो. मात्र कामगार रुग्णालयाच्या इमारतीची दुरवस्था झाली आहे. या रुग्णालयात जिल्ह्यातून मोठ्या प्रमाणात कामगार उपचारासाठी दाखल होत असतात. मात्र रुग्णालयात मंजूर कर्मचाऱ्यांच्या २४८च्या तुलनेत फक्त १३१ कर्मचाऱ्यांची भरती करण्यात आली. रुग्णालयातील अनेक उपकरणे ही ४० वर्षांपेक्षा अधिक जुनी आहेत. एक्सरे मशिन, पल्स ऑग्झिमीटर, बेडसाइड मॉनिटर, यांसारखी महत्त्वाची उपकरणे उपलब्ध नाहीत. रुग्णवाहिकेपासून अनेक प्राथमिक सुविधा नसल्याने त्याचा त्रास रुग्णांना होत आहे. त्यामुळे येथे शस्त्रक्रियाही होत नाहीत.मुंबई आयआयटीने मे महिन्यात मुख्य इमारतीचे स्ट्रक्चरल ऑडिट केले असता, मुख्य इमारतीसह सर्व ११ इमारती धोकादायक असल्याचा अहवाल देत त्या जमीनदोस्त करण्याची शिफारस केली होती. तर उर्वरित दोन इमारतींची दुरुस्ती सुचवण्यात आली होती. या सर्व समस्या खासदार डॉ. श्रीकांत शिंदे यांनी लोकसभेच्या शून्य प्रहरात उपस्थित केल्या होता. तसेच या सर्व इमारतींच्या नव्याने बांधणीसाठी निधी उपलब्ध करण्यासाठी मागणी केली होती. या रुग्णालयाच्या जागी सुपरस्पेशालिटी रुग्णालयाच्या निर्मितीची मागणी शिंदे यांनी केली. या संदर्भात शुक्रवारी कामगार राज्य विमा योजनेचे महासंचालक राजकुमार यांची भेट घेतली. यावेळी खासदार शिंदे यांनी रुग्णालयाच्या समस्या राजकुमार यांच्यासमोर मांडल्या असता त्यांनी राज्य सरकारचा सविस्तर प्रस्ताव येताच पुनर्विकासाला मंजुरी देण्याचे आश्वासन दिले. या बैठकीला एसिक सदस्य खासदार चंद्रकांत खैरही उपस्थित होते.
कामगार विमा रुग्णालयाचा पुनर्विकास होणार
2017-08-11Worli-based engineering college set to move base to Ulhasnagar - Times of India
Worli-based engineering college set to move base to Ulhasnagar Updated: Aug 11, 2017, 08:41 AM IST MUMBAI: A Worli-based engineering college is all set to move its base to Ulhasnagar as their existing campus does not have sufficient land. Over 400 students from Watumull Institute of Electronics Engineering and Computer Technology College will now be shifted to their campus in Ulhasnagar. The college, which was put under the 'no-admission' category for 2017-18 by the All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE), also managed to get permission to admit students by the Supreme Court. AICTE, the apex regulatory body for technical institutions, had barred few colleges from admitting students in the current academic session. While the colleges such as MH Sabook Siddik College of Engineering and Thadomal Shahani College of Engineering were granted permission to admit students after they fulfilled the requisite norms, Watumull failed to get relief from the Bombay high court. It then moved the SC seeking relief. In a recent order, the apex court granted permission to the institute to admit students for this academic session. However, the institute is yet to acquire the occupancy certificate for the new campus. The court mentioned that 'if after inspection, any deficiency is noticed, the same shall be removed by the petitioners within three weeks. If the deficiencies are not removed, the students shall prosecute studies but the college shall not admit students for the next academic year 2018-19'. AICTE officials will be conducting two inspections at the new campus of the college, first by August 25 to see the 'nature of the complex', and the second by September 8 to 'see the instruments'. Vice-principal Avinash Gondal said the college has been wanting to shift to the new campus for last three years and have been mentioning it in their brochure too.
Worli-based engineering college set to move base to Ulhasnagar - Times of India
2017-08-10Ulhasnagar civic body chief cancels pothole filling contracts worth Rs 4.5 crore - Times of India
Ulhasnagar civic body chief cancels pothole filling contracts worth Rs 4.5 crore Aug 10, 2017, 05:45 AM IST ULHASNAGAR: The Ulhasnagar Municipal Commissioner Rajendra Nimbalkar on Tuesday cancelled tender of Rs 4.5 crore given to two contractor of pothole filling work by standing committee without following E-tendering process in Ulhasnagar. The action is taken after Shiv Sena MLA Balaji Kinikar raising question about tender given to two contractors Jha Company and Jaibharat construction had demanded state government to probe in to matter saying while giving contract standing committee overruled section 37D of Maharashtra Mahapalika Act that gives authority civic body to issue contract of Rs 25 lakh only that too in case of emergency while to issue more amount tender their is compulsion to follow E-tendering process.Acting on complaint, the UMC commissioner Nimbalkar on Tuesday cancelled tender and directed city engineering department to issue online E-tendering for road work as soon as possible so that pothole filling work can be started soon. Another side Standing Commitee chairman Kanchan Lund who is in question for issuing tender raised question about Shiv Sena role in to tender saying it was Shiv Sean's members in standing committee who suggested about contractors for road work those who work for civic body in past during their tenure. She further said that in contract they even had given even clause that in same amount contractor will be responsible for one years to repair if potholes emerged again. With new development it looks pothole filling work will not get complete before Ganesh festival.
2017-08-09निविदेविना कामाला आयुक्तांची स्थगिती
निविदेविना कामाला आयुक्तांची स्थगिती Updated: Aug 10, 2017, 03:00AM IST साडेचार कोटी रुपये खर्चून रस्ताकामे; रीतसर निविदा काढणार म. टा. वृत्तसेवा, उल्हासनगर गणेशोत्सव आणि सिंधी समुदायाच्या चालिया उत्सवाच्या नावाखाली शहरातील रस्त्यांवर पडलेले खड्डे अत्यावश्यक कामाच्या नावाखाली दुरुस्त करण्याचा वादग्रस्त निर्णय स्थायी समितीने घेतला होता. यासाठी साडेचार कोटी रुपयांचे कंत्राट निविदा प्रक्रिया न राबवता देण्यात आले होते. मात्र स्थायी समितीच्या या निर्णयाला अखेर आयुक्तांनी स्थगिती दिली असून, या कामांची निविदा काढत हे काम देण्यात येणार असल्याने या वादावर पडदा पडला आहे. उल्हासनगर महापालिकेची आर्थिक स्थिती कमकुवत असून, मालमत्ता कराच्या उत्पन्नातही वाढ करण्यात पालिकेला यश आलेले नाही. मात्र पालिकेच्या तिजोरीत खडखडाट असताना स्थायी समितीच्या मनमानी कारभारामुळे आणि वादग्रस्त निर्णयामुळे सध्या स्थायी समितीच वादात सापडली होती. गणेशोत्सव आणि चालिया उत्सवाच्या निमित्ताने शहरातील चारही प्रभागांतील रस्त्यांवरील खड्डे बुजवण्यासाठी प्रत्येक प्रभागात साधारण एक कोटी रुपयांचे काम करण्यात येणार होते. यासाठी अत्यावश्यक कामांच्या नावाखाली नियम ५ (२) (२) च्या अंतर्गत स्थायी समितीने शहरातील रस्त्यांवरील खड्डे बुजवण्यासाठी रीतसर निविदा प्रक्रिया न राबवता साडेचार कोटी रुपयांच्या कामाला मंजुरी दिली होती. या निर्णयाला विरोधकांसह काही सत्ताधाऱ्यांनीही विरोध केला होता. मात्र आर्थिक गणितात सर्वांचाच सहभाग असल्याने हा विरोध पोकळ असल्याची चर्चा राजकीय वर्तुळात होती. तसेच, या वादग्रस्त निर्णयामुळे स्थायी समितीच वादाच्या भोवऱ्यात सापडली होती. त्यामुळे या निर्णयाबाबत आयुक्त काय भूमिका घेतात, याकडे सर्वांचे लक्ष लागले होते.अखेर रस्त्यांवरील खड्डे बुजवण्यासाठी ज्या दोन कंपन्यांना कंत्राट दिले होते, तो निर्णय रद्द करण्यात आल्याचे आयुक्त निंबाळकर यांनी सांगितले असून, शहरातील रस्त्यांवरील खड्डे बुजवण्यासाठी रीतसर निविदा काढण्यात येणार असल्याचेही आयुक्तांनी सांगितले. साई पक्षाकडे असलेल्या स्थायी समितीच्या निर्णयामुळे भाजपची कोंडी झाली होती. अखेर ‘साई’च्या या निर्णयाला खो घातल्यानंतर भाजप आणि ‘साई’त अंतर्गत वाद उफाळण्याची शक्यता निर्माण झाली आहे. सध्या सोशल मीडियावर नगरविकास मंत्र्यांच्या आदेशामुळे स्थगिती आणल्याचा मेसेज फिरत आहे. मात्र ही चुकीची माहिती असून मला नगरविकास मंत्र्यांकडून असा कुठलाही आदेश आला नाही. आयुक्त म्हणून याबाबत निर्णय घेणे माझी जबाबदारी होती. त्यामुळे निविदेबाबतचा कुठलाही हस्तक्षेप झाला नाही. नियमानुसार निविदा प्रक्रिया राबवण्यात येत आहे. राजेंद्र निंबाळकर, आयुक्त, उल्हासनगर महानगरपालिका
निविदेविना कामाला आयुक्तांची स्थगिती
2017-08-08कारवाईची धास्ती व्यापाऱ्याच्या जीवावर?
कारवाईची धास्ती व्यापाऱ्याच्या जीवावर? Updated: Aug 8, 2017, 03:00AM IST म. टा. वृत्तसेवा, उल्हासनगर कॅम्प नंबर पाच परिसरातील कैलाश कॉलनी येथील आरक्षित भूखंडावर वसलेल्या घरांना आणि दुकानांना पालिकेने कारवाईची नोटीस बजावत दुकाने रिकामी करण्याचे आदेश दिले होते. मात्र अनेक वर्षांपासून सुरू असलेल्या दुकानांना पालिकेने नोटीस बजावल्याने या भागातील दुकानदार दान बहादुर यांचा हृदयविकाराने मृत्यू झाल्याचा आरोप त्यांच्या कुटुंबाने केला आहे. कैलाश कॉलनी येथे स्मशानभूमीचे आरक्षण असलेला भूखंड पालिकेने परिवहन सेवा चालवणाऱ्या केस्ट्रल कंपनीला दिला होता. या भूखंडावर मागील काही वर्षांत मोठे अतिक्रमण झाले होते. तसेच परिवहन सेवा बंद झाल्यानंतर कंत्राटदार आणि पालिकेचा जागेचा वाद न्यायालयात गेला होता. या लढ्यात नुकताच पालिकेच्या बाजूने न्यायालयाचा निकाल आला होता. त्यामुळे पालिकेने हा भूखंड ताब्यात घेतला. याच भूखंडावर मागील काही वर्षांपासून आठ घरे आणि १३ व्यापारी गाळे उभारले होते. आयुक्तांनी प्रभाग अधिकाऱ्यांना १३ दुकानांवर कारवाईचे आदेश दिले. प्रभाग अधिकाऱ्यांनी येथील दुकानदारांना नोटीस बजावत दुकाने रिकामी करण्याचे आदेश दिले होते. मात्र याच दुकानांपैकी एक असलेले दान बदाहुर यांना पालिकेच्या नोटिशीने धक्का बसल्याने त्यांचा हृदयविकाराने मृत्यू झाल्याचा आरोप त्यांच्या कुटुंबीयांनी केला आहे.
2017-08-08Not allowed to meet wife, man stabs bro-in-law | Mumbai News ... - Times of India
Not allowed to meet wife, man stabs bro-in-law Aug 9, 2017, 12:22 AM IST ULHASNAGAR: A 38-year-old man tried to kill his brother-in-law and his friend who tried to save him by stabbing them with a knife in Ulhasnagar on Monday night.Police said the accused Shatrughan Tiwari was unhappy with his brother-in-law Anjani Mishra for not allowing him to meet his wife or speak to her over phone. While, Mishra suffered serious injuries, his friend Kunal Gupta (25) has sustained minor injuries. Vijay Dolas, senior police inspector from Central police station said, "We have registered an attempt to murder case and searching for Tiwari who is now on the run." Tiwari and his wife Sonal were staying separately following a dispute.
Not allowed to meet wife, man stabs bro-in-law | Mumbai News ... - Times of India
2017-08-06चालकाला मारहाण करून गाडी पळवली
चालकाला मारहाण करून गाडी पळवली Updated: Aug 7, 2017, 03:00AM IST उल्हासनगर : गाडीच्या भाड्यावरून वाद घालून तीन जणांच्या टोळीने चालकाला मारहाण करून त्याला त्याच्याच गाडीतून पळवून नेऊन आळेफाटाजवळील घाटात सोडून त्याच्या इंडिका गाडीसह रोख रक्कम व मोबाइलफोन जबरदस्तीने चोरी करून ते पळून गेल्याची घटना घडली आहे. उल्हासनगरातील कॅम्प क्र. १ येथील तानाजीनगर परिसरात सुनील मिश्रा(२८) हा ड्रायव्हर राहतो. तीन अनोळखी व्यक्तींनी त्याची इंडिका गाडी भाड्याने घेऊन उल्हासगनरातील केंबिज शोरूमजवळील टॅक्सी स्टॅण्ड येथून सायंकाळी साडेपाचच्या सुमारास प्रवासास निघाले होते. गाडीचे भाडे देण्यावरून वाटेत त्या तिघांनी ड्रायव्हर सुनील मिश्रा याच्याशी वाद घातला. तसेच, सुनील याला गाडीत मारहाण केली. आळेफाटा परिसरातील टाकळी ढोकेश्वरजवळील घाटावर त्या तिघांनी सुनिलच्या जवळील मोबाइल रोख रक्कम व इंडिका गाडी असा ७२ हजार रुपयांचा माल लुटत सुनीलला सोडून तिघे गाडी घेऊन पळून गेले. सुनीलने दिलेल्या फिर्यादीवरून उल्हासनगर पोलिस ठाण्यात तिघांविरोधात गुन्हा दाखल करण्यात आला आहे.
2017-08-05Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation has a Brutus in its midst - News - Mid-Day
Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation has a Brutus in its midst Mumbai | Posted 05-Aug-2017 It's a pity when a rotten apple disrupts a well-oiled organisation. That's the problem the Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation (UMC) seems to be facing currently. The civic body that has left no stone unturned in recovering taxes, particularly property tax, from citizens and defaulters, coming up with innovative campaigns for the same, has initiated an inquiry after coming across an instance of misuse of power by one of its employees. Authorities found out that a tax inspector had collected a mere R10 lakh under property tax from a wine shop owner, as opposed to the total dues of Rs 70 lakh, by showing his store area as much less than what it was. The fraud within Bhagwati Wines in Shriram Chowk, Ulhasnagar IV, occupies an area of around 8,000 sqm. However, those in-charge of collecting the tax showed the area as 400 sqm.The shop is in a ground-plus-two-storey building, wholly owned by the wine store owner. The liquor outlet is on the ground floor, while the owner has rented out the first and second floors to a garment outlet. Assistant Municipal Commissioner and head of the tax collection department Yuvraj Badane had visited the place and put up a notice declaring that the owner needed to pay Rs 70 lakh property tax. After that, Badane went on leave and tax inspector D L Magar was tasked with recovering the amount. He allegedly forged documents and showed a tax of Rs 10 lakh. A senior civic official said, "Rs 10 lakh is the shop's property tax for a year. It hasn't paid for the past six years; that makes it Rs 60 lakh, taking the total amount to Rs 70 lakh." When Badane returned and noticed the discrepancy, he sent a notice to Magar, seeking an explanation. Magar replied that he had been under pressure from UMC employee Dada Patil and RPI corporator Bhagwan Bhalerao to do the billing in that manner. Explanations sought Badane said, "We have sent a notice and investigation is on." UMC commissioner Rajendra Nimbalkar has sent a notice to Bhalerao. "Our own employee said he was working under pressure of the corporator; so, I had to ask for an explanation. We will probe the case thoroughly. I can speak further on this only after eight days as by then I will get a clear picture of the goings-on," he said. The wine shop owner, Pritam Kukreja, however, has called this harassment, claiming that the authorities had carried out measurements of the shop and followed the law. "They sent us a bill for Rs 10 lakh; we paid. This is harassment... they are trying to cheat us. Why should we pay more? It's not the right amount for a shop this size," he added.
Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation has a Brutus in its midst - News - Mid-Day
2017-08-05Death goes live for 'likes' - Times of India
Death goes live for ‘likes’ Updated: Aug 6, 2017, 04:11 AM IST When actors Ranbir Kapoor and Anushka Sharma croon the "break-up song" in Bollywood flick 'Ae Dil Hai Mushkil', he helpfully advises her to update her social media status from "baasi relationship ka label" (in a relationship) to "available" and get on with her life. If only it were so easy to handle a heartbreak. In June this year, when Hani Aswani of Ulhasnagar, a Mumbai suburb, broke up with his girlfriend of six years, he decided to hang himself. And, to drive home the message, the 26-year-old live-streamed his last moments to his ex on a video call. Mumbai student Arjun Bharadwaj, too, needed an audience, it seems. In April this year, the depressed 24-year-old checked into a hotel and posted alive tutorial on suicide. Then, he took a swig of his drink, puffed a cigarette and with a vacant stare into the camera, spoke his last words, "see you on the other side", before jumping off the window on the 19th floor. In April, a 32-year-old man from Sonepat hanged himself and live-streamed the episode on Facebook. Evidently, a generation hooked to social media every waking minute is unable to let go even in death. David D Luxton, co-author of a 2012 US study, Social Media and Suicide: A Public Health Perspective, says one reason for this public display of the final moments could be a way to "get back" at those who they feel have bullied or caused them hurt in some way. "If one's intent is to communicate the intensity of their feelings to others, doing so publicly online may seem to them to have the greatest impact," he says. It also encourages what Luxton calls the "social media contagion". Social media platforms such as chat rooms and discussion forums may pose a risk for vulnerable groups by influencing decisions, such as to die by suicide. It was earlier restricted to traditional media, he says, "but now contagion can be spread by anyone who communicates on the internet, such as through Facebook posts, Twitter feeds, blogs or their own websites." Aasra, a Mumbai-based helpline for mental health that provides support to Facebook on suicide alerts, has seen a sharp increase in the number of calls a day from 4-5 to 50 in the past six months. A primary concern with suicide or self-harm videos is they may normalise and encourage self-injurious behaviour or cause victims to lose inhibition towards such actions, says the 2012 US study. In a search on keywords "self-injury" and "self-harm", the study found that of the 50 most viewed videos, 64% had visual representations of self-harm, specifically cutting. A textbook case of such behaviour was on display last week when a Mumbai teen jumped to his death, allegedly in response to the Blue Whale challenge. The last photo he posted on Instagram was on a terrace parapet with a caption saying, 'Soon the only thing you would be left with is a picture of me'.Posting of suicide notes on Facebook is a reflection of the growing dependence on social media for validation and acknowledgement, say psychiatrists.For some, it's their way of communicating last message with the world. A message that could be lost, or destroyed by their family members or the police if it was on pen and paper. Something that AIIMS anaesthetist Priya Vedi, married for five years to a man reported to be homosexual, managed to do.Unable to continue the pretence of a happy married life, she posted a heart-rending note on her FB account before killing herself. Towards the end she addressed a larger audience: "If someone in our society is like him, please don't marry a girl to save yourself, you people by doing so not playing with someone's emotions also with a girl and her family's life (sic)." Aasra director Johnson Thomas says suicide notes on social media are a cry for help from those who may not be getting the kind of attention they are looking for.
Death goes live for
2017-08-03Mumbai residents to pay more for domestic PNG, CNG - Mumbai Mirror
MUMBAI RESIDENTS TO PAY MORE FOR DOMESTIC PNG, CNG Updated: Aug 3, 2017, 06.36 PM IST Mumbai: In a direct impact of GST's implementation, Mahanagar Gas Ltd on Thursday hiked the prices of piped natural gas (PNG) for domestic users and compressed natural gas (CNG) for vehicle owners with immediate effect, an official said here. While PNG prices have been increased by Rs 0.19 per unit, CNG has been hiked by Rs 0.32 per kg with effect from midnight of August 2-3. Accordingly, the revised retail sale price of domestic PNG in Slab I has gone up from Rs 24.42 per unit to Rs 26.61 per unit. Similarly, the CNG retail sale price has increased from Rs 40.82 per kg to Rs 41.14 per kg for vehicle owners. A similar Rs 0.19 per unit price hike is effective on domestic PNG consumers in Slab II, an official spokesperson said. In view of the abolition of local body tax and octroi after implementation of the GST, the sale prices of both PNG and CNG in other municipal areas outside Mumbai have been rationalised and will be common to all the supply regions. Presently, MGL supplies domestic PNG to around 9.70 lakh consumers in Mumbai and the Mumbai Metropolitan region comprising municipal areas of Thane, Navi Mumbai, Mira Road-Bhayander, Kalyan, Dombivali, Ulhasnagar, Ambernath, Badlapur, Bhiwandi, Taloja and Panvel, besides around 5.60 lakh CNG vehicles owners in these localities.
Mumbai residents to pay more for domestic PNG, CNG - Mumbai Mirror

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Nitin Lulla      [ 2012-02-01 ]
Jaise mumbai bahar se khubsoorat hai or Andar se utna hi ganda or worst hai, waise hi ulhasnagar b lookiwise acha hota ja raha hai but uski tarah andar se ganda or khatrnak b ho raha hai..
ajusudhir      [ 2012-01-24 ]
I LOVE ULHASNAGER
rajesh varma      [ 2011-12-30 ]
kindly control the street dog... in ulhasnagar 1
Lalu      [ 2011-12-25 ]
Please clear the illegal Parkig of 2 lines of Trucks Parked on both sides of road at Vithalwaadi Rly. station raod, near kajal Petrol Pump, Ulhasnagar-3.
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